a taste of autumn…

Fall’s gone, it’s raining outside, and the fog is supposed to be thick. I’m about to go see for myself. This should stay your eyes until I can put up the rest of the autumn foliage online. : )  DSC_0164DSC_0183DSC_0245 DSC_0250 DSC_0258 DSC_0259

the glow of fall colors…

Some trees are turning into brilliant reds, yellows, and oranges, but you might not notice it at certain times of day. The angle of the sun makes a huge difference to whether those maple trees are lit up from behind, or whether the buildings block all the sun. DSC_0038

DSC_0041DSC_0050I made a point of going to look at the maple trees by the Rhodes Hall Annex, between classes. Quickly, I found that if I stood on one side, the trees looked almost dull and interesting, because the sun was behind me. When I was on the other end of the row, the leaves were back-lit by the sun, and the glorious colors were amazing to look at.DSC_0039

DSC_0042DSC_0043So, if you’re like me, short on time and daylight (the time did just change, after all), you can still find these small pockets of time and places to take pictures. I wish I could go into the mountains and see the really gorgeous color changes… but I can’t. I look for the nearby pieces of brightness, instead.DSC_0045DSC_0046DSC_0052

a bit of reflection…

I was actually looking at trees, when I took my camera on campus, the other day. The leaves are changing, and while I don’t always have time to go to the Botanical Gardens, I walk among tons of trees, every day at school. So, bring the camera, and go take a few pics between classes (instead of napping in the Cooper library). Simple, right?DSC_0033

But it was only after I took these pictures that I realized I should have taken a few more that focused especially on the reflection on the pond surface. I usually think the name of “Reflecting Pond” or “Reflection Pond” (does anyone know which it is?) for the body of water in front of Cooper is rather odd, because nothing reflects when the fountains are on. But with the mornings getting chillier, they don’t turn the fountains on until later in the morning (do they wait for a certain time or a certain temperature?). DSC_0033-001

So, while playing around with the coloring and cropping of all my photos, I decided to play with my one photo of the pond’s reflection. The first is a slightly edited original and then I cropped that for the second and third. Maybe you didn’t notice, at first, that the second and third photos are the same, except for the different coloring. But I like how they all look, and mean to look for another opportunity to take this type of photo, some other morning, when I have the time.DSC_0033-002

falling away…

DSC_0958 Thinking of my Aussie friends, who don’t get to enjoy the beauty of the autumn leaves. However, many Americans would also love the idea of never having to rake the fallen leaves again. So, it’s a mixed bag. Enjoy the glorious colors!DSC_0963DSC_0973DSC_0980

patience makes red seeds…

The magnolia seeds are popping from their cones. When I finally noticed this, I had to remember to put my camera in my backpack, on a day when I would have time to take a few pictures. Well, that’s unless I wanted to go back in to school on the weekend. I’d rather not, thanks.DSC_0938

Some of the cones had released their seeds some time ago, leaving the brown, dried out hull on the branch. Some branches were completely bare of any sign of cones, so I knew the cones had already fallen to the ground. If you remember those weeks when I was stalking the magnolia flowers, I assure you that I know where some of the flowers were located.  : )DSC_0935

DSC_0950As I was in the middle of the process of getting my major changed (finally), I took a few pictures near Hunter Hall, but then hiked up to Edwards Hall. I’m glad I did, because the magnolia cones weren’t plentiful by Hunter, but I found some just loaded with red seeds, when I walked past Rhodes. You see, those red seeds are a favorite food to squirrels and birds, so there’s only a short time period when you’ll find them. DSC_0942

Do you know how long it takes a Southern Magnolia to be grown from the seeds? I think they can be grown from cuttings, too, but think of the patience it takes, waiting for the seeds to sprout, if you choose that route! Fifteen years to break through the ground, possibly? If the squirrels don’t get to them, first.DSC_0947

From there, I kept walking past the library and up to Edwards, peering at any passing Southern Magnolia tree, and wondering why some of them had shed their seeds already. After that, I was able to successfully get the final signatures on my paper to change my major, after running back and forth between buildings for the last week or two.

DSC_0948Walking out of Edwards Hall had a surreal feeling, because their first floor lobby has a painting of R. C. Edwards, whom the building was named for. Since my junior high school was named for him, I had seen a copy of that painting, many times, during my teen years. But walking past it, twenty years later, gave me a really strange feeling.  I was still in college, right?DSC_0952

And if you’re wondering about my major change, don’t worry. I’m still a history major. Technically, I’ve been one since I started school this fall, but OFFICIALLY, I was still in the books as a PRTM major from back when I was 18. Don’t ask. It was a major that sounded sort of interesting, at the time, and I thought that I HAD to declare something. But all these years later, it was still in the books. DSC_0946

Soon, I’ll be able to consult with my actual advisor in the history department, and then figure out what classes I’ll be taking next semester. My goal is to have only 15 credits in the spring, and maybe have a leisure course or two included. I could use a breather.DSC_0953

a-rose-is-a-rose, a-toes-is-a-toes…

DSC_0882 DSC_0885 DSC_0886 DSC_0887 DSC_0889 DSC_0893Bonus points for you, if you’ve figured out where my blog post title comes from…