booking my way through…

Maybe this is cheating, but for those who like to read and might be interested in what I’ve read, or how many books I’ve read so far this year, I’ve just updated my list. But since glancing through the list, it might just be more interesting to make a post of it… also to wrestle with the font size on my blog. Probably the only thing I dislike about this layout, is the fact that I can’t make the font any slower when I want to. So, when you write a list of books… it gets spaced out and things look worse, I think. No MLA format here, except when I’m writing up the post. Which is cheating. I have an idea that the font will look normal, and then it doesn’t. But I like the rest of this page’s layout, so I deal with it.

In the process of transferring the list over, I have discovered that using bullet points may help my list look more compact. I may have to start doing it that way on the official book pages.

  • January
  • Maid to Match – Deeanne Gist
  • The Far West (Frontier Magic #3) – Patricia C. Wrede
  • Rosemary Cottage (Hope Beach #2) – Colleen Coble
  • The First Dragon (The Chronicles of the Imaginarium Geographica #7) – James A. Owen
  • Blood of Tyrants (Temeraire #8) – Naomi Novik
  • Aristocrats: Caroline, Emily, Louisa, and Sarah Lennox, 1740-1832 – Stella Tillyard
  • Total: 6

You can probably tell that my January list is a combination of a slowly starting semester at school and me trying to finish all the books that I received for Christmas (or bought myself, afterwards). The First Dragon was a long-awaited finale to a fantastic series, and I’m only sad that there will be no more books in that series. But I can always read them again, because there’s always more to get out of Owen’s amazing stories. But the final book, Aristocrats, is the start of my school reading, and I had decided since it was a fairly thick book, I was going to get started long before we needed to read it for Irish History. So, a month or so later, while my classmates were racing to read it or skim it, I just reviewed. It was quite an interesting true story, based completely on the letters of the four sisters… but the writer makes it read almost like a novel.

  • February
  • The Phantom Ship – Frederick Marryat
  • Never Trust a Liberal Over Three: Especially a Republican – Ann Coulter
  • Head in the Clouds – Karen Witemeyer
  • Latino Immigrants and the Transformation of the U.S. South – Mary E. Odem & Elaine Lacy (editors)
  • The Foundling – Georgette Heyer
  • Total: 5

You may already have guessed, but I never would have read that book on Latino immigration, if it wasn’t required for one of my history classes. Not a heavy read, by any means, but so many big words and explanations of moving populations and things. We later had to do research on immigrant populations in our hometown, which was an interesting project, since some of us did our research on modern times from newspaper articles, while others researched back into the early 1900’s in their towns. The Phantom Ship was a Gothic novel that we read for my British Literature class, and definitely not what I expected, either in the book or the class. Based on the tale of The Flying Dutchman and Captain Vanderdecken, it’s a slightly different spin on the story than some of us have heard… if we’ve heard any of them at all.

  • March
  • The Spanish Bride – Georgette Heyer
  • The Black Moth – Georgette Heyer
  • The Eternal Paddy: Irish Identity and the British Press, 1798 to 1882 – Michael de Nie
  • These Old Shades (Alastair #1) – Georgette Heyer
  • The Opposite House – Helen Oyeyemi
  • Devil’s Cub (Alastair #2) – Georgette Heyer
  • Friday’s Child – Georgette Heyer
  • The Hunger Games – Suzanne Collins
  • Catching Fire (Hunger Games #2) – Suzanne Collins
  • The Burning of Bridget Cleary – Angela Bourke
  • Mockingjay (Hunger Games #3) – Suzanne Collins
  • The Quiet Gentleman – Georgette Heyer
  • Death in the Stocks – Georgette Heyer
  • Total: 13

While doing some heavier reading for Irish History, in March, I went on a Georgette Heyer binge, to give myself a bit of an escape. I was writing plenty of papers at this time, too, so Heyer was perfect for reading while I ate. I think I saw the movie Catching Fire, somewhere around this time, so I decided I needed to read the trilogy again. And while I did NOT enjoy reading The Opposite House in British Literature (I developed a hatred for “magical realism” during the previous semester), I do credit Oyeyemi’s book with re-introducing me to the poetry of Emily Dickinson. I had a vague impression, left over from elementary or middle school, that Dickinson was dark and depressing. No, she’s delightful and fascinating. Maybe I just wasn’t ready for her, when I was younger.

  • April
  • They Found Him Dead (Inspector Hannasyde #3) – Georgette Heyer
  • The Misfit Soldier: Edward Casey’s War Story, 1914 to 1918 – Edward S. Casey
  • No Wind of Blame (Inspector Hemingway #1) – Georgette Heyer
  • The Unfinished Clue – Georgette Heyer
  • Behold, Here’s Poison (Inspector Hannasyde #2) – Georgette Heyer
  • Envious Casca (Inspector Hemingway #2) – Georgette Heyer
  • Why Shoot a Butler? – Georgette Heyer
  • Royal Escape – Georgette Heyer
  • Apes and Angels: The Irishman in Victorian Caricature – L. Perry Curtis, Jr.
  • Belfast Diary: War as a Way of Life – John Conroy
  • The Unknown Ajax – Georgette Heyer
  • Ireland: A Short History – Joseph Coohill
  • Mansfield Park – Jane Austen
  • Her Mother’s Hope (Marta’s Legacy #1) – Francine Rivers
  • Total: 14

In April, I continued reading my entire collection of Heyer, including her mysteries, while I developed a sincere dislike for the character of Edward Casey. His small memoir was required reading during Irish History, and gave us another viewpoint during WWI and the Easter Rebellion in Ireland. But Casey was not a nice person, let’s just say, and I didn’t appreciate some of the dirty spots in his narrative. On the other hand, Belfast Diary was a fascinating book, and I had difficulty believing that I wasn’t reading a dystopian novel, instead of about Northern Ireland, just a few years ago. And Apes and Angels was a short read, with lots of pictures, because I had to write a paper comparing it with The Eternal Paddy (previous month’s reading) for Irish Hist. I had some difficulty figuring out how to compare them, since I had never written a paper for that teacher before, but the books were very interesting, which helped. And with the end of the semester, I rounded off that month with rereading Mansfield Park, and as always, trying to figure out how they could turn that into a movie that does the book justice. Because no movie version of this Austen book can ever get it right, because Fanny Price is shy, quiet, and physically weak. In this day and age, how do you get an audience to root for a heroine who never speaks up for herself, and doesn’t have the strength for a long walk? No, they always mess with that formula, because the studios can’t figure out how to do it. Maybe they could take a page from the BBC production of Little Dorrit, though…

  • May
  • Venetia – Georgette Heyer
  • Mirror Sight (Green Rider #5) – Kristen Britain
  • The School for Good and Evil, #1 – Soman Chainani
  • The Extraordinary Education of Nicholas Benedict – Trenton Lee Stewart
  • A Turn of Light (Night’s Edge #1) – Julie E. Czerneda
  • Total: 5

I got a surprise package in the mail, in May, because I had ordered Britain’s latest book in the Green Rider series… and forgotten about it. I think I pre-ordered it in January. So, it didn’t matter HOW many pages were in that doorstop of a book. I finished it in 24 hours. And while Stewart’s latest book about Nicholas Benedict was aimed at kids, I found it charming and a wonderful read. After that, I took a swing at a completely new author (to me) from the fantasy book section, and really liked Czerneda’s A Turn of Light.

  • June
  • Conform: Exposing the Truth About Common Core and Public Education – Glenn Beck
  • The Reluctant Widow – Georgette Heyer
  • Frederica – Georgette Heyer
  • Arabella – Georgette Heyer
  • The Talisman Ring – Georgette Heyer
  • The Nonesuch – Georgette Heyer
  • The Host – Stephenie Meyer
  • The Maiden of Mayfair (Tales of London #1) – Lawana Blackwell
  • East – Edith Pattou
  • The Sable Quean (Redwall #21) – Brian Jacques
  • Ballet Shoes – Noel Streatfeild
  • Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone (Year 1) – J. K. Rowling
  • Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets (Year 2)– J. K. Rowling
  • Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (Year 3) – J. K. Rowling
  • Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (Year 4) – J. K. Rowling
  • Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (Year 5) – J. K. Rowling
  • Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince (Year 6) – J. K. Rowling
  • Total: 17

When I didn’t find a part-time job for the summer, I continued to work on straightening up my other room downstairs, going through boxes and donating things. Also, rearranging the books after I had to empty the shelves and move them, because of a water leak. I promise, when I read this many books, I’m still finding other things to do, I just have plenty of reading time on my hands, late into the night, or whenever. While I enjoyed rereading Meyer’s The Host, I finally watched the movie version. They obviously didn’t have a very big budget, and a few good actors didn’t make up for some of the sets or special effects. Also, the fact that Saoirse Ronan’s character had an “inner voice” was played for too much effect, and it became annoying. The book is much better. And yes, I went on a Harry Potter kick and read them all in about a week.

  • July
  • Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (Year 7) – J. K. Rowling
  • The Masqueraders – Georgette Heyer
  • The Corinthian – Georgette Heyer
  • Cotillion – Georgette Heyer
  • Lady of Quality – Georgette Heyer
  • The Tales of Beedle the Bard – J. K. Rowling
  • Pistols for Two – Georgette Heyer
  • Bath Tangle – Georgette Heyer
  • Liberal Fascism: The Secret History of the American Left From Mussolini to the Politics of Meaning – Jonah Goldberg
  • In Defense of Internment: The Case for ‘Racial Profiling’ in World War II and the War on Terror – Michelle Malkin
  • Bamboo & Lace – Lori Wick
  • Total: 11
  • Grand Total: 71

And now, my total for reading this year, thus far, puts me well ahead of my reading goals for the year. I set myself a lower number on Goodreads, in case being in school caused me to read less. Well, I was keeping up just fine, even before summer started. Because I can never read my school books while I’m eating, so I’m always reading multiple books at the same time, during the school year. If you’re checking my July list, I finally finished up with my Georgette Heyer books, INCLUDING some of her serious historical fiction books, which are a lot heftier than the mysteries and romances. At the same time, her books that concern the Napoleonic Wars, some of them have been used at military academies, in the past, because her write-up of certain battles were that good. The Spanish Bride (which is based on a real couple, and Harry Smith’s diary was one of the references) is supposed to do a phenomenal explanation of some of the battles and campaigns, as well as the descriptions of some of the generals.

How did I get off on that tangent? For July, I also decided I had to finish one of the books that I started after Christmas… but got totally sidetracked when school started. I just could not get back into it while the semester was underway, so I have finally finished reading Liberal Fascism. I’ve owned it for several years, but then my brother borrowed it and it took a few years to get it back.  : )  At present, I am racing through Whittaker Chambers’ Witness, with every intention of being finished with it before school starts. Let’s see, it has about 800 pages and I began it slightly over a week ago. I’m just over halfway through. He was one of the men that broke with Communism before WWII and testified against Communists in the State Department. And if you HAVE heard about this subject, and disbelieve it, his testimony has been verified by the Venona decrypts, which were declassified several years ago. Chambers was vilified by liberals as a liar who slandered Alger Hiss and others… but he was right. There were Communist spies working in the State Department, doing their best to help the Soviet Union and bring the United States down.

But it’s a FASCINATING book, not just because of the subject matter, but because he’s a phenomenal writer. He reminds me a bit of G. K. Chesterton, and I have difficulty reading some of Chesterton’s stuff because he’s so brilliant. Chambers has a power of description and a way of explaining both his early life and his times with Communism… taking you into why people really become Communists and turn against their country. And how he managed to break free, when he became disillusioned with it.

As I said, I still have at least 350 pages to go. I should be finished in another week, because rather then read constantly, I’ve been doing other things around the house, and studying my German. I want to be ahead of the game when school starts, rather than completely out of practice, like the rest of my classmates. So, otherwise, I’d finish the book a bit sooner.

I hope the rest of your summer is enjoyable, and I’ll keep updating my book list, as the year goes by.

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