a not-hiatus…

I’ve been writing on my blog so little, that I’ve wondered whether I should actually declare (like some do) that they’re taking a certain period of time off from writing. But in the end, I don’t want to do that, because when something interesting which I do actually want to write about comes along… I need somewhere to write it!

But if I’m being honest with myself and my readers, I have reached a different stage in my life from when I started this blog. No adventures in Australia await me, until I can graduate and save up more money, even though I might see some Aussie friends in the next month (possibly in DC). I’m not stuck in a job that doesn’t require much thought, so I don’t have tons of spare time to go take photographs, either on campus or around the local botanical garden.

Instead, I’m continuing on a different “adventure” that occupies most of my time, and there’s nothing wrong with that. I made the Dean’s List in my first semester back in school, and then reached the President’s List on my second. I hope and plan to stay on the President’s List for as long as possible, hanging onto all those A’s. Admittedly, it still annoys me that I couldn’t quite make that A in Military History, during that first semester. My ability to remember and explain military strategy for essay exams “did me in”, just slightly.

I try and remind myself of all these things, when I feel like I’m neglecting my blog. But when you spend a lot of time writing for school, and editing and re-editing everything, you don’t always feel like writing anything else! This semester, while I feel a bit like it’s a slower collection of classes, the differences in what I’m required to write fills in the gaps enough to keep me running full tilt.

For example, my Geology and Western Civ classes never have any written homework, only reading, and it’s just a matter of keeping up and being prepared for tests. Other classes have homework, but no exams, and the homework is fairly easy in Geography. The writing for my other class… well, let’s say that it’s a different type of writing than I usually do for my history or literature classes. I have to work hard during the week, sometimes, to give myself swathes of time to write on the weekend. Or at least, empty my head enough of other things, in order to be able to write.

And certainly not least of all, I’ve been getting back into my Bible studies, on my own, and realized the need for my daily times spent in the Word of God. I always make time for that after I’ve finished my homework, which means that I have to stay on top of everything, so that I will be finished.

Perhaps I’m only reiterating what I’ve written about, on and off, in the last few months. But sometimes, I need to write it out to convince myself. I am a writer, which means I always need an outlet to write on. If not on a blog, then in e-mailed letters to friends. But now, I have other outlets that allow me to blow off some of that writing steam that builds up inside.

So, busy as I get, I never plan to go on hiatus from this blog… if I did take a vacation of any sort, I would probably spend more time blogging, especially if I went somewhere interesting. But it may be a long, long time before I come back to blogging as a very regular thing. Because I need the time and brain power for other things right now. And there’s nothing wrong with that.

If you read through all that, thanks for staying with me. Have a marvelous week, and I promise I’ll come back eventually, ok?

booking my way through…

Maybe this is cheating, but for those who like to read and might be interested in what I’ve read, or how many books I’ve read so far this year, I’ve just updated my list. But since glancing through the list, it might just be more interesting to make a post of it… also to wrestle with the font size on my blog. Probably the only thing I dislike about this layout, is the fact that I can’t make the font any slower when I want to. So, when you write a list of books… it gets spaced out and things look worse, I think. No MLA format here, except when I’m writing up the post. Which is cheating. I have an idea that the font will look normal, and then it doesn’t. But I like the rest of this page’s layout, so I deal with it.

In the process of transferring the list over, I have discovered that using bullet points may help my list look more compact. I may have to start doing it that way on the official book pages.

  • January
  • Maid to Match – Deeanne Gist
  • The Far West (Frontier Magic #3) – Patricia C. Wrede
  • Rosemary Cottage (Hope Beach #2) – Colleen Coble
  • The First Dragon (The Chronicles of the Imaginarium Geographica #7) – James A. Owen
  • Blood of Tyrants (Temeraire #8) – Naomi Novik
  • Aristocrats: Caroline, Emily, Louisa, and Sarah Lennox, 1740-1832 – Stella Tillyard
  • Total: 6

You can probably tell that my January list is a combination of a slowly starting semester at school and me trying to finish all the books that I received for Christmas (or bought myself, afterwards). The First Dragon was a long-awaited finale to a fantastic series, and I’m only sad that there will be no more books in that series. But I can always read them again, because there’s always more to get out of Owen’s amazing stories. But the final book, Aristocrats, is the start of my school reading, and I had decided since it was a fairly thick book, I was going to get started long before we needed to read it for Irish History. So, a month or so later, while my classmates were racing to read it or skim it, I just reviewed. It was quite an interesting true story, based completely on the letters of the four sisters… but the writer makes it read almost like a novel.

  • February
  • The Phantom Ship – Frederick Marryat
  • Never Trust a Liberal Over Three: Especially a Republican – Ann Coulter
  • Head in the Clouds – Karen Witemeyer
  • Latino Immigrants and the Transformation of the U.S. South – Mary E. Odem & Elaine Lacy (editors)
  • The Foundling – Georgette Heyer
  • Total: 5

You may already have guessed, but I never would have read that book on Latino immigration, if it wasn’t required for one of my history classes. Not a heavy read, by any means, but so many big words and explanations of moving populations and things. We later had to do research on immigrant populations in our hometown, which was an interesting project, since some of us did our research on modern times from newspaper articles, while others researched back into the early 1900’s in their towns. The Phantom Ship was a Gothic novel that we read for my British Literature class, and definitely not what I expected, either in the book or the class. Based on the tale of The Flying Dutchman and Captain Vanderdecken, it’s a slightly different spin on the story than some of us have heard… if we’ve heard any of them at all.

  • March
  • The Spanish Bride – Georgette Heyer
  • The Black Moth – Georgette Heyer
  • The Eternal Paddy: Irish Identity and the British Press, 1798 to 1882 – Michael de Nie
  • These Old Shades (Alastair #1) – Georgette Heyer
  • The Opposite House – Helen Oyeyemi
  • Devil’s Cub (Alastair #2) – Georgette Heyer
  • Friday’s Child – Georgette Heyer
  • The Hunger Games – Suzanne Collins
  • Catching Fire (Hunger Games #2) – Suzanne Collins
  • The Burning of Bridget Cleary – Angela Bourke
  • Mockingjay (Hunger Games #3) – Suzanne Collins
  • The Quiet Gentleman – Georgette Heyer
  • Death in the Stocks – Georgette Heyer
  • Total: 13

While doing some heavier reading for Irish History, in March, I went on a Georgette Heyer binge, to give myself a bit of an escape. I was writing plenty of papers at this time, too, so Heyer was perfect for reading while I ate. I think I saw the movie Catching Fire, somewhere around this time, so I decided I needed to read the trilogy again. And while I did NOT enjoy reading The Opposite House in British Literature (I developed a hatred for “magical realism” during the previous semester), I do credit Oyeyemi’s book with re-introducing me to the poetry of Emily Dickinson. I had a vague impression, left over from elementary or middle school, that Dickinson was dark and depressing. No, she’s delightful and fascinating. Maybe I just wasn’t ready for her, when I was younger.

  • April
  • They Found Him Dead (Inspector Hannasyde #3) – Georgette Heyer
  • The Misfit Soldier: Edward Casey’s War Story, 1914 to 1918 – Edward S. Casey
  • No Wind of Blame (Inspector Hemingway #1) – Georgette Heyer
  • The Unfinished Clue – Georgette Heyer
  • Behold, Here’s Poison (Inspector Hannasyde #2) – Georgette Heyer
  • Envious Casca (Inspector Hemingway #2) – Georgette Heyer
  • Why Shoot a Butler? – Georgette Heyer
  • Royal Escape – Georgette Heyer
  • Apes and Angels: The Irishman in Victorian Caricature – L. Perry Curtis, Jr.
  • Belfast Diary: War as a Way of Life – John Conroy
  • The Unknown Ajax – Georgette Heyer
  • Ireland: A Short History – Joseph Coohill
  • Mansfield Park – Jane Austen
  • Her Mother’s Hope (Marta’s Legacy #1) – Francine Rivers
  • Total: 14

In April, I continued reading my entire collection of Heyer, including her mysteries, while I developed a sincere dislike for the character of Edward Casey. His small memoir was required reading during Irish History, and gave us another viewpoint during WWI and the Easter Rebellion in Ireland. But Casey was not a nice person, let’s just say, and I didn’t appreciate some of the dirty spots in his narrative. On the other hand, Belfast Diary was a fascinating book, and I had difficulty believing that I wasn’t reading a dystopian novel, instead of about Northern Ireland, just a few years ago. And Apes and Angels was a short read, with lots of pictures, because I had to write a paper comparing it with The Eternal Paddy (previous month’s reading) for Irish Hist. I had some difficulty figuring out how to compare them, since I had never written a paper for that teacher before, but the books were very interesting, which helped. And with the end of the semester, I rounded off that month with rereading Mansfield Park, and as always, trying to figure out how they could turn that into a movie that does the book justice. Because no movie version of this Austen book can ever get it right, because Fanny Price is shy, quiet, and physically weak. In this day and age, how do you get an audience to root for a heroine who never speaks up for herself, and doesn’t have the strength for a long walk? No, they always mess with that formula, because the studios can’t figure out how to do it. Maybe they could take a page from the BBC production of Little Dorrit, though…

  • May
  • Venetia – Georgette Heyer
  • Mirror Sight (Green Rider #5) – Kristen Britain
  • The School for Good and Evil, #1 – Soman Chainani
  • The Extraordinary Education of Nicholas Benedict – Trenton Lee Stewart
  • A Turn of Light (Night’s Edge #1) – Julie E. Czerneda
  • Total: 5

I got a surprise package in the mail, in May, because I had ordered Britain’s latest book in the Green Rider series… and forgotten about it. I think I pre-ordered it in January. So, it didn’t matter HOW many pages were in that doorstop of a book. I finished it in 24 hours. And while Stewart’s latest book about Nicholas Benedict was aimed at kids, I found it charming and a wonderful read. After that, I took a swing at a completely new author (to me) from the fantasy book section, and really liked Czerneda’s A Turn of Light.

  • June
  • Conform: Exposing the Truth About Common Core and Public Education – Glenn Beck
  • The Reluctant Widow – Georgette Heyer
  • Frederica – Georgette Heyer
  • Arabella – Georgette Heyer
  • The Talisman Ring – Georgette Heyer
  • The Nonesuch – Georgette Heyer
  • The Host – Stephenie Meyer
  • The Maiden of Mayfair (Tales of London #1) – Lawana Blackwell
  • East – Edith Pattou
  • The Sable Quean (Redwall #21) – Brian Jacques
  • Ballet Shoes – Noel Streatfeild
  • Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone (Year 1) – J. K. Rowling
  • Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets (Year 2)- J. K. Rowling
  • Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (Year 3) - J. K. Rowling
  • Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (Year 4) – J. K. Rowling
  • Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (Year 5) – J. K. Rowling
  • Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince (Year 6) - J. K. Rowling
  • Total: 17

When I didn’t find a part-time job for the summer, I continued to work on straightening up my other room downstairs, going through boxes and donating things. Also, rearranging the books after I had to empty the shelves and move them, because of a water leak. I promise, when I read this many books, I’m still finding other things to do, I just have plenty of reading time on my hands, late into the night, or whenever. While I enjoyed rereading Meyer’s The Host, I finally watched the movie version. They obviously didn’t have a very big budget, and a few good actors didn’t make up for some of the sets or special effects. Also, the fact that Saoirse Ronan’s character had an “inner voice” was played for too much effect, and it became annoying. The book is much better. And yes, I went on a Harry Potter kick and read them all in about a week.

  • July
  • Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (Year 7) – J. K. Rowling
  • The Masqueraders – Georgette Heyer
  • The Corinthian – Georgette Heyer
  • Cotillion – Georgette Heyer
  • Lady of Quality – Georgette Heyer
  • The Tales of Beedle the Bard – J. K. Rowling
  • Pistols for Two – Georgette Heyer
  • Bath Tangle – Georgette Heyer
  • Liberal Fascism: The Secret History of the American Left From Mussolini to the Politics of Meaning – Jonah Goldberg
  • In Defense of Internment: The Case for ‘Racial Profiling’ in World War II and the War on Terror – Michelle Malkin
  • Bamboo & Lace – Lori Wick
  • Total: 11
  • Grand Total: 71

And now, my total for reading this year, thus far, puts me well ahead of my reading goals for the year. I set myself a lower number on Goodreads, in case being in school caused me to read less. Well, I was keeping up just fine, even before summer started. Because I can never read my school books while I’m eating, so I’m always reading multiple books at the same time, during the school year. If you’re checking my July list, I finally finished up with my Georgette Heyer books, INCLUDING some of her serious historical fiction books, which are a lot heftier than the mysteries and romances. At the same time, her books that concern the Napoleonic Wars, some of them have been used at military academies, in the past, because her write-up of certain battles were that good. The Spanish Bride (which is based on a real couple, and Harry Smith’s diary was one of the references) is supposed to do a phenomenal explanation of some of the battles and campaigns, as well as the descriptions of some of the generals.

How did I get off on that tangent? For July, I also decided I had to finish one of the books that I started after Christmas… but got totally sidetracked when school started. I just could not get back into it while the semester was underway, so I have finally finished reading Liberal Fascism. I’ve owned it for several years, but then my brother borrowed it and it took a few years to get it back.  : )  At present, I am racing through Whittaker Chambers’ Witness, with every intention of being finished with it before school starts. Let’s see, it has about 800 pages and I began it slightly over a week ago. I’m just over halfway through. He was one of the men that broke with Communism before WWII and testified against Communists in the State Department. And if you HAVE heard about this subject, and disbelieve it, his testimony has been verified by the Venona decrypts, which were declassified several years ago. Chambers was vilified by liberals as a liar who slandered Alger Hiss and others… but he was right. There were Communist spies working in the State Department, doing their best to help the Soviet Union and bring the United States down.

But it’s a FASCINATING book, not just because of the subject matter, but because he’s a phenomenal writer. He reminds me a bit of G. K. Chesterton, and I have difficulty reading some of Chesterton’s stuff because he’s so brilliant. Chambers has a power of description and a way of explaining both his early life and his times with Communism… taking you into why people really become Communists and turn against their country. And how he managed to break free, when he became disillusioned with it.

As I said, I still have at least 350 pages to go. I should be finished in another week, because rather then read constantly, I’ve been doing other things around the house, and studying my German. I want to be ahead of the game when school starts, rather than completely out of practice, like the rest of my classmates. So, otherwise, I’d finish the book a bit sooner.

I hope the rest of your summer is enjoyable, and I’ll keep updating my book list, as the year goes by.

havin’ some slow days…

I suppose I could cheat and just post lots of pictures from my phone, for Wordless Wednesday… but WW is only fun when there are one or two really quality pics to show off. It’s much more fun to explain what’s in them, when possible. For now, I just caught up on emptying last month’s photos off of my phone… even my Seabrook phone photos (with a few small exceptions) hadn’t been pulled for those posts. I had to go and review what pictures I had posted last… and it was all dessert and Seabrook and Asheville! Wow, those were some time ago… IMG_20140516_200126IMG_20140517_223833IMG_20140518_181259Well, since my time at Seabrook and in Charleston, I’ve been doing a few things around the house, searching for a part-time job, and enjoyed having my brother’s best friends over with their new baby. Not necessarily in that order. As you’ll see, I’ve included a few of my Instagram pics from my weekend in May…IMG_20140519_141438IMG_20140519_141541IMG_20140520_091511And then Jon’s friends came over with their little A, and isn’t she a beauty? My mom and I, of course, volunteered to hold her as often as needed, so that our friends could chow down on the homemade spaghetti and Italian bread (yes, homemade pasta, as well as sauce and bread). IMG_20140528_205044IMG_20140528_190953IMG_20140528_220747While at home, and in-between trying to remember that the pool is open, and I can also go to the gym again, I’ve been working on my spare room, rearranging things, and emptying more boxes. I found my old Barbie clothes (handmade, by my grandma, mostly) and took the time to wash them all. Then I discovered a past water leak had warped one of my shelves… and I had to empty them! Trashed the room again, in order to move the shelves around, but finally got that done. Some paint and plastic sheeting, and finally they were ready to go up again, which is what I spent some of today working on. But I either got a charley horse the other day, or pulled a muscle, so I’ve been moving slow for the last few days, and trying to get things back to normal. IMG_20140601_205827

IMG_20140603_220831IMG_20140605_191530Oh, and before I had to take the big shelves apart, I did manage to get another desk set up in the corner, with my Temeraire picture and Gandalf set up, as well as hanging another shelf in my bedroom. Trying to be good about getting rid of things I really don’t need, and find a place for everything that I keep. It’s not easy, is it?IMG_20140617_200257IMG_20140618_140623IMG_20140618_225150Hope you like the photos… I really enjoy how some of my Instagram pics look, so I’ve included them here, since I used camera photos for my last few posts. I hope you are having a wonderful summer! (Ok, if you’re in Australia, I hope you’re having a great winter!)IMG_20140624_203219Now, I’m going to get another cuppa, and go back to reading Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (again).  : )IMG_20140528_183319IMG_20140622_124812

the best of books, pt. 2…

If you’ve been following along with my last book post, I began this lengthy write-up for an Australian friend who wanted some book recommendations for her kids. And then it grew from there… except I got completely side-tracked by being back in school, and never finished it until recently. Or I suppose I can’t say I’ve finished it yet, since this is the other half? But honestly, I went through my entire book collection (not including what might be on my Kindle) and wrote down all the authors that would be excellent for teens and pre-teens to read. And these are all books that I enjoyed when I was a kid, or still enjoy, now that I’m a grown-up.

But if you’ve ever read any of my posts about books before, you’ll know that I have a bone to pick with bookstores that provide all sorts of fantastical books for the “young adults”, and deceive them into thinking that the only “good” reading is about vampires, werewolves, demons, and zombies. Don’t get me wrong, some of them are decent, and most of them are not. And that’s not even getting into the dystopian category, which is the new writing fad. I like to remind everyone that Barnes & Noble (and other brick-and-mortar stores) have a dreadful habit of putting a lot of the good reading in the “children’s section”. You know, the 12 and under section. Going to try and convince your teen to walk past the picture books, in order to find something good to read? But that’s where the Newbery Medal books are, as well as many other good books!

Sure, there’s garbage in the Childrens’ section, also. Every adult/parent needs to search through these books, and make good choices for their children or for themselves. There are a lot of fantasy tales out there… but there are still amazing family oriented stories like the Penderwicks (Jeanne Birdsall) and the Boxcar Children (Gertrude Chandler Warner), with not fantasy involved. It can be done, people! And if it’s well-written, there’s nothing wrong with a retelling of a classic fairytale, or a new story about an amazing new world. Ask for advice from friends that read, and look for recommendations on Amazon and Goodreads! There are even books listing good books for children (and the one I found was printed in the 90’s, so I’m sure it has some good stuff in it.

Now, I’ll try and get off that rabbit trail and get back to work, talking about books that I love now and books that I remember loving from when I was a child. Remember, no matter what I recommend or the age group I suggest, check up on it yourself, and read along with your kids! Some of these books, I’ve read many, many times, and will continue to do so until I can’t read anymore (perish the day…). And so, continuing with my list of authors and some of their books…

Astrid Lindgren – Pippi Longstocking, Pippi in the South Seas, etc.. –  Ah, Pippi… for some reason, I didn’t have a copy of the first book, when I was little, so I grew up reading Pippi in the South Seas, though I had seen the movie version of the first book and loved it. It was always excessively comical, her amazing strength, despite her size, and how she didn’t think quite the same way as normal kids and people. Just really good fun for the readers.

Lois Lowry – The Giver, Number the Stars, etc.. - I always tell myself that one day, I need to read Number the Stars. Any author that can win TWO Newbery Medals with her books, as well as several Newbery Honor mentions… her books are known to be fantastic. But for some reason, I’ve never gotten around to it, because it’s well-known that this particular book concerns the Holocaust. Serious subject, not a long book… everyone should read it, including me. However, I’ve always been fascinated by her book, The Giver. Yes, I know some of you are aware that it’s being made into a movie, but I’m very skeptical of all the trailers. It seems like they decided they needed more action, and the trailer does not seem to be completely true to the book. I love Walden Media, but I do NOT want them screwing this up. When I first read it, I didn’t know what a dystopian future was, nor am I still sure it’s even set in our future. What is understandable that Jonas is just like every child in his village, waiting to see what his vocation will be, when he turns twelve. In their world, they don’t choose for themselves, but their leaders always choose correctly, as far as the children know. He has a family that loves him and jokes with him… but only when he meets the Giver himself will Jonas realize that his life is NOT in fact, normal. This book is part of a series, now, but it stood on its own when I first read it, and I’ve never needed another. The other books to follow are well-written, especially the last one (which I thought fell flat at the end, as if an end was required, but not enough heart was put into it), but I don’t find that they tie well together, and none of them ever held the fascination of the first. You and your kids can decide for yourself, of course.

M. I. McAllister – The Mistmantle Chronicles: Urchin of the Falling Stars - I actually have three books from this series, and I’ve only read the first one. They reminded me of the Redwall books, and yet they’re not QUITE as good. However, the characters and the drawings were delightful, and I think that anyone who loves animals would enjoy the adventures involved. But like I said, keep an eye on things, since I didn’t read the sequels.  : )  My opinion remains that no author can beat Brian Jacques, however.

Robin McKinley - The Blue Sword, The Hero and the Crown, Chalice, Pegasus, Beauty, Rose Daughter, Spindle’s End - Please be warned… as much as I love McKinley’s books, I do not recommend them all. If they are not on this list, be very careful. Sunshine and Donkeyskin, especially, are NOT for children. Several of her other books are fun or strange, by turns, but the above list are my favorites. Well, except for Hero and the Crown. For some reason, her Newbery Medal book is not my favorite, but that’s not because it’s bad. My older brother really liked it, but I always found the dragon strangely creepy or dark… I can’t explain it. But this is personal preference, whereas the ones I warned you against have stuff you do not want your kids reading. Hero is actually the “prequel” of sorts to The Blue Sword, which is one of my favorites, and understandably, it won a Newbery Honor. My younger brother and I still rave about Harry’s adventures… Anyone would enjoy that one! Beauty and Rose Daughter are two different retellings of Beauty and the Beast, one having been written many years before the other, and the first was for younger readers. Both are excellent. Spindle’s End is a retelling of Sleeping Beauty and it’s probably my favorite of them all. Unless Pegasus beats it, but I’m still waiting for the Pegasus sequels. Again, some of her books are for young readers, and some are definitely NOT. Please be aware of it…

Marie McSwigan – Snow Treasure - This one is supposed to be based on a true story. I wouldn’t know, but it’s a fantastic story. Set during World War II, the country of Norway is invaded by Nazis, and the villagers must figure out how to rescue the millions of dollars in gold bullion that has been hidden from the Germans. The local children, with their sleds, are drawn into the race to save the gold bullion from the enemy, and get it safely to America. I never grew tired of this book, and eventually, the cover got worn off from too many readings.

Catherine Marshall – Christy - Loosely based on Marshall’s own time spent teaching in the Appalachian Mountains, Christy tells about a young woman from the city leaves her family to teach in the backwoods. The poverty of the locals is extreme, prejudice against her city ways is rampant, and while not set during the pioneer times, it might as well be for the little these people had. While the author writes very true to life, she doesn’t paint over the hardships… but unlike some books nowadays, she doesn’t glorify the hardships, either. Maybe “wallow” is the word I’m looking for. Some books can be very dark, because the authors seem to revel in the dirt. Marshall only tries to make you see the backwoods people through her heroine’s eyes, but people do die of disease or injury. Just be aware that an avid young reader can handle this, but you may want to read ahead of them, in case they’re not ready for it.

L. M. Montgomery – Jane of Lantern Hill, The Blue Castle, Anne of Green Gables series, Pat of Silver Bush (duology), Emily of New Moon (trilogy) - Oh, dear… I shall try my best to avoid one of my favorite “rants”. We’ll see how I do. But if you’ve read or watched Anne of Green Gables, yes, it’s a fantastic book and great movie. But you need to read the rest of the series. ALL of them. And while I enjoy the first two movies, which are an amalgam of 4-5 of the books, I have never and will NEVER watch the third movie, because it’s a load of hogwash. Gilbert does not go to war… but I can’t rant about that, because I may give away some of what happens in the later books. The truth is, I love Anne, but I love her children just as much, and it’s very possible that Rilla of Ingleside (#8) is my favorite. Rilla was Anne’s youngest daughter, if you’re wondering, and that book was set during WWI… but I won’t tell you any more because I can’t give away Dog Monday or anything else. But since I’m talking about Montgomery, please remember that these may SEEM like girl books, but they’re wonderful stories, and boys should take the time to read them, too. The mischief, the fun! And for the record, Anne may be the best-selling of her books, but she’s not my favorite character in the books. My favorite set is probably the Pat of Silver Bush duo, and probably because not only is Pat great fun, but those books contain Judy Plum. There’s never been a more amazing character, I’m quite sure. And yes, I love the Emily trilogy, as well, and everyone needs to read those, too.

But if you’re looking for a SINGLE book of Montgomery’s to read, no series or trilogy involved, it’s a toss-up between Jane of Lantern Hill or The Blue Castle. Well, the best one is definitely The Blue Castle (probably my absolute favorite book), but I can see where the younger kids may enjoy Jane, first. While both books center on characters that have been lonely and put upon for their whole lives, Jane is a pre-teen who is sent to Prince Edward Island to meet her father, while Valancy is a 29 year old spinster who dreams of love that she thinks she can never have. Don’t be deceived by any blurb that’s ever been attached to The Blue Castle… you won’t believe the incident that brings Valancy out of her shell, and the hilarity that ensues. But no matter which book of L. M. Montgomery’s that you read, one thing never changes… even in her short stories… the characters are REAL. They are so well-written that you expect them to walk off the page, and you will adore them and break your heart over them, every time. It doesn’t matter how many hundred times I’ve read some of them, my heart still cries out over certain parts, and I still laugh over others. Sit your family down and read them ALL. No ifs, ands, or buts.

Robert O’Brien – Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of NIMH, The Silver Crown - If you’re like me at all, you were raised on not only Disney animated films, but on Don Bluth films such as The Land Before Time, An American Tail, and… The Secret of NIMH. I have no recollection if I knew beforehand that NIMH was based on a book or what, but if you’ve seen the movie, they really changed the storyline around a LOT. It’s still a good film, but concentrates on magical elements which aren’t in the story. That said, I finally got around to reading it, and it’s really a wonderful book (no wonder he won a Newbery for it), following the story of these super-intelligent rats that have made a home for themselves in the country, and how they work together with Mrs. Frisby to save her son. My memories of The Silver Crown are rather vague, but I just read a review of it on Amazon. That reviewer says that they’ve loved this book since they were 10 years old, but that it has a few mature or alarming incidents that some less mature readers might not be ready for. It all depends on your reader! But I do remember that the little girl wakes up with a silver crown next to her pillow, and must find out what it’s there for and what she’s capable of doing with it… Tantalizing, don’t you think?

Scott O’Dell – Island of the Blue Dolphins, The Black Pearl, Sing Down the Moon, etc.. - I’m pretty sure that O’Dell wrote about a million books, because I’m always coming across them in used book stores, and many are stories that I’ve never heard about. Many are historical fiction, but parents should also be aware that they do not all end happily. The one that I read the most was Island of the Blue Dolphins, and maybe some of the sadness of the book was a bit much for me, at the time… but I still liked it. What would it be like to be stranded on an island, alone, and to have to make your own clothes, a shelter out of whale bones, and befriend the wild dogs and the cormorants? And I’m pretty sure at that age, I thought the “elephant fight” was between real elephants, instead of elephant seals… but even that doesn’t change anything to a child’s imagination. You learn from these things. The Black Pearl was darker, as I remember, and tells the story of Ramon and his finding of a lustrous black pearl, which may set El Diablo after him… I don’t even remember what happens, I think I thought it was scary, at the time. It isn’t very long, however, so you can easily read through it to see whether your child can handle it. But I should perhaps mention that Island won the Newbery Medal, while Black Pearl won a Newbery Honor, as did Sing Down the Moon, which is a tale of soldiers forcing a Navajo tribe on a forced march (though I don’t know if I ever read it). Others of his stories involve Eskimos in the Iditarod, and pioneers all over America.

Baroness Emmuska Orczy – The Scarlet Pimpernel - Everyone should read this. I don’t care how old you are, this book is amazing. Yes, there are amusing movie versions, but even they never get it quite right. This is the story of the League of the Scarlet Pimpernel, made up of some of the rich lords of England, doing their best to save the aristocrats of Paris from the Terror, but it is also the tale of the beautiful Marguerite, married to the stupidest Englishman of them all… but is he really? Blackmail and intrigue are involved, and some of the best comedic scenes ever… I can’t even describe the wonders of this book. My older brother and I read my mom’s copy so many times that the cover came off and the book was falling apart, so we had to buy her a new one. This story doesn’t have anything too hard for the young folk to read, though the wording might be a little more formal than they’re used to. And for those that are worried about issues of a touchier nature, there is an episode with a Jew, near the end of the book, which talks about the qualities of their “race”, and isn’t very flattering. I only mention this in case your children take note of it, and you want to know what they refer to… but I had probably read the book a hundred times before I even noticed anything odd about it. All in all, a fantastic adventure/love story.

James A. Owen – The Chronicles of the Imaginarium Geographica: Here, There Be Dragons, The Search for the Red Dragon, etc.. -I’ve been reading this series for about ten years now, and the last one was published this year. It’s very sad. But it’s an amazing series, and I highly recommend it! Especially if you not only love a fantasy adventure, but love literature. Because Owen involves three famous authors, right from the start of the first book… and as the books progress, you meet more of them. In this world of the Chronicles, there are always Guardians of the Imaginarium Geographica, a book of maps of the worlds of fantasy. In every century, there are new guardians and apprentice guardians, who can travel back and forth between our world to the Archipelago of Dreams. And the Archipelago itself? It’s where all our favorite magical lands are located, and some that have never been written about. For example, the land of Prydain. But the lands are not always exactly like how we read about them, because different authors/guardians use them for inspiration, or invent their own lands. And when they invent a new land in a book, it’s very likely that a new one will appear in the Archipelago. By the final book, I was amazed at how Owen could bring characters like Mark Twain, Shakespeare, Jules Verne, and many more, to life within the pages, and keep it from being confusing! But it doesn’t start that way. With the first book, John, Jack, and Charles are swept off on an unexpected adventure after the death of their mentor… and they are thrown headfirst into a guardianship that they know nothing about. You’ll meet the talking badgers, led by the wonderful Tummeler (who always calls the scholars “Scowlers”), as well as Captain Nemo, Mordred, and the descendants of Arthur Pendragon. It’s a wonderful tale, just right for all those book lovers and literature geeks… some of whom are still only kids. Be aware that there are a few dark themes, and some characters don’t make it through the story, as a result of run-ins with the Shadowborn (think something like a Ringwraith, but different). These are great for kids, but keep an eye on them, in case they can’t handle a few scary spots or the loss of a beloved character. You should read them with your kids, if you have the time… I just LOVE this series.

Linda Sue Park – A Single Shard - Set in long ago Korea, this story is of an orphan who dreams of becoming a master potter, and even travels to the Royal Court eventually, in hopes of achieving that dream…. It’s been several years since I read this, so my memories are vague except that it’s excellent and won the Newbery Medal. I find that I get it mixed up with one of the following books by Paterson, but Amazon says it’s for Grades 5-8.

Katherine Paterson – Bridge to Terabithia, Lyddie, Of Nightingales That Weep, Jacob Have I Loved, The Great Gilly Hopkins - Not every person likes Bridge to Terabithia, and I don’t even remember all of what I thought as a child, reading it. It ends sadly, so please be aware, for your child’s sake. But the other part that sticks in my mind is how the children go to a remote location and pretend it’s their own country, and they use their imaginations to make up the adventures they have. What child doesn’t love that kind of thing? But despite it being a Newbery Medal winner, the adventures they had in their own world… I didn’t remember much about it, until I saw the movie and then reread the book. But while it may have fantastical elements, this is a story of friendship between outcasts and how life doesn’t always pass us by, when the hardships come. So, you may want to read it before your child, or keep an eye on them, in case you find them in tears at some point. Still, an excellent book. Lyddie is much more of a farm story (I think), but Nightingales is a totally different ballgame. I’m not sure whether to recommend it for the kids or not, despite it being a fascinating story about a young girl in Imperial Japan… but the twist at the end and who she marries… it’s a good story, but is it appropriate for the kids? You might need to read this one ahead of your child. Or wait. Katherine Patterson is an amazing author, so no wonder she received a Newbery Honor for Gilly Hopkins and a Newbery Medal for Jacob Have I Loved. I’m pointing this out ahead of time, because I’m completely prejudiced when it comes to Jacob Have I Loved, and want you to understand that it’s probably a good book. But I have a history of disliking most books that I had to read in middle or high school, because we had to “dissect” them so much, or even because I just didn’t like the stories. Maybe I should re-read it, but I’ve yet to get past my dislike of several books I had to read in middle school (including Jack London’s Call of the Wild). This book deals with a pair of twins, one who feels like she is the least loved, and how she deals with her growing up years. The reviews are good on Amazon, so I’m just trying to be honest… you should probably give it the chance I’ve never been able to give it.  : )

Edith Pattou – East - A retelling of the tale, East of the Sun, West of the Moon, this story follows Rose as she lives in a land where significance is seen in the direction a child was facing when they were born. Rather than admit her child is a wild North-born, her mother hides the truth, but Rose can’t deny who she is. Eventually, she will go on a great adventure, in order to save her family, an adventure you will love to read about. Now I want to read this again, it’s been so long since I read it.

Donita K. Paul – DragonSpell, DragonQuest, etc.. -There is a genre known as Christian fantasy… I don’t know what you think of it, but some is good, some is strange. I really enjoyed this series, though it won’t stand up to Tolkien, by any means. Kale is a young girl who starts out as a slave, raised amongst a people not at all like her, sent on an adventure, where she encounters dragon eggs and then the small dragons that hatch from them. The people she meet tell her about the wonders of Paladin (you can see the parallels to Jesus), who himself is the servant of Wulder. It’s very obvious where the parallels are, and I’m not really a fan of stories that make it so obvious, because Jesus and God are… well, they’re not meant to be trivialized. But somehow, these books manage the parallels, and some of the characters like the Wizard Fenworth are enormously fun… and I love stories about dragons. So, while I think the early parts of the series are better than the later books, these are an enjoyable read, and you could probably have some interesting conversations with your children about what the author’s trying to say about us, as well as about God and Jesus.

Rick Riordan – Percy Jackson, The Heroes of Olympus - I enjoy mythology, just like I enjoy fairytales. So, I got a kick out of Riordan’s modern take on the mythology of old, both Roman and Greek. And even if these are written in a manner to imply it’s narrated by a teenager, the Percy books are still quite fun. However, I think Riordan stepped it up a notch when he reached Heroes, because he has to really work at mixing Greek and Roman mythology, and making sure the characters are believable. So, while I’m enjoying the second series more than the first, you have to read the first series to get to the second. And while I’m remembering, I started to read his Kane Chronicles, and didn’t enjoy them at all. Those are stories based on the mythology of Egypt, but I quickly stopped caring about the story or the characters.

J. K. Rowling – Harry Potter series - Of course, everyone has heard of Harry Potter. At this point, you’ve either read them all and watched all the movies… or you’ve still avoided them completely. Back in 2000, I was working in a book store and still avoiding them completely, because our store would put on really ridiculous parties for the days when a new book was published. My coworkers and I all avoided those books, because they were so popular and the kids in their costumes were SO annoying. Lightning bolts on foreheads? I didn’t know why and I didn’t care. I knew what all the covers looked like, though, and hated them. Some of you are still like this, I’m sure. Many years later, probably a year or three before the final book came out, I think I discovered that a cousin of mine, whose opinion I trust, had read and enjoyed them. I decided it was time to give it a chance, and I was hooked. You know what? They’re fun. I already like fantasy, and this was good writing with a believable world, and yes, everyone wishes they could magically make doors open and that they could fly on broomsticks. But while I truly enjoy the books, and I’m still working on getting one of my bookworm brothers to give them a chance (my less book-reading brother started them at Christmas, and then bought himself the series, reading them within two weeks), I understand the people that still avoid them. I was one of you, so I’m not going to judge… well, not much. But while they are not Tolkien by any means, they do have a very recognizable fight between good and evil, and we want for the good guys to win. If you don’t mind your kids reading about magic, then your whole family will enjoy these. Though you may want to keep an eye on them with the last book or two, because it can get pretty dark in spots. Also, for the movies… if you haven’t seen them, please be warned that the opening scenes of Deathly Hallows, Pt. 1 is really creepy and scary. I was a bit horrified, and I knew it was in the book. And that isn’t the only frightening scene with the snake in the movie (or the book), so please be cautious.

Brittney Ryan – The Legend of Holly Claus - This is such a beautifully illustrated book, don’t miss out by getting a Kindle edition, even if they do include pictures. Ryan’s book tells the story of St. Nicholas, who is the ruler of the Land of the Immortals, and he is finally asked what HE wants for Christmas. He and his wife want a child, and so Holly Claus is born… but she has a spell cast upon her at birth (rather like Sleeping Beauty). She is raised by her loving parents, but someday must figure out how to break her curse. I love this story.

Ruth Sawyer – Roller Skates - I remember loving this book, though I only vaguely remember what it is about. It won the Newbery Medal, and follows the story of a little girl who goes around New York City (early 1900’s) on roller skates, making friends, and having adventures. I was younger than 10 when I read it, which is why I don’t remember what happened at all, except that it’s a wonderful book.

George Selden – The Cricket in Times Square - Likewise, I don’t really remember what adventures that Chester the Cricket has with Mario, Tucker the Mouse, and Harry the Cat, just that it was a fun book (also a Newbery Honor book).

Brian Selznick – The Invention of Hugo Cabret -This is a good book, but technically, it isn’t very long. You see, this one won a Caldecott Medal, which is for illustrations. So, while it looks like a really thick novel, it’s mostly pictures. They’ll be fascinated to your kids, I’m sure, but I felt like I’d been robbed, when I realized the story wasn’t as long as the pages of drawings. The artwork is amazing, though, and the movie is good fun, too.

Elizabeth George Speare – The Witch of Blackbird Pond, The Bronze Bow, The Sign of the Beaver, Calico Captive - Many years ago, I think my older brother gave me a copy of The Witch of Blackbird Pond for my birthday, and I never looked back. Kit Tyler arrives from Barbados in the colony of Puritans in Connecticut, to their great surprise. But while she is welcomed, they are not well-to-do, and don’t understand her outgoing ways. She knows how to swim, makes friends with Quakers, and wears silk dresses. But she comes to love her family and when Kit is accused of being a witch (think like in the Salem Witch Trials), what will happen next? This book definitely deserves the Newbery Medal it won, and remains one of my favorite childhood books. Speare also wrote other books that won the Newbery Medal (The Bronze Bow) and the Newbery Honor (The Sign of the Beaver), as well as an Indian captivity tale (Calico Captive). If you want to get some historical fiction, as well as learn how the main characters strive to get along or understand those that are different from them, these are excellent reading for you.

Johanna Spyri – Heidi - My favorite version of this movie stars Michael Redgrave, Jean Simmons, and Maximilian Schell. Not Shirley Temple. Though, in a strange way, the Shirley Temple version is more true to the story. Well, maybe, I can’t remember exactly. But in the book, Fraulein Rottenmeier is a very strict lady who is not a big fan of Heidi, while the Jean Simmons version has her as a delightful woman who loves the girls. For once, I don’t care, I adore that movie. My heart stops every time Clara is left on the mountain to try and walk… Ok, I’m getting away from the point. This is a wonderful story of an orphaned girl who goes to live with her grandfather in the Alps, but when she has to leave him to go to the city, she becomes dreadfully homesick. However, she comes to love the spoiled Clara, who can’t walk, and hopes to make her better by coming to see her on the mountain. It’s a heartwarming, wonderful story that every boy and girl should read. And watch the 1968 television version of the movie… because Redgrave, Simmons, and Schell! That’s why! They’re amazing.

Trenton Lee Stewart – The Mysterious Benedict Society trilogy, The Extraordinary Education of Nicholas Benedict – A mysterious ad in the newspaper brings any number of children to a building to go through lots of mind-boggling tests and riddles. The rewards for the winners? To create a society that will be able to go on a secret mission that only children can fulfill. These books are delightful, with their fascinating puzzles and riddles, with the children each finding many different ways of solving them. And after reading the trilogy, I really enjoyed the prequel, though it had less riddling and more development of Nicholas Benedict’s character. It was fascinating to see how he didn’t really believe in love, despite his extensive learning, because he had never seen love in action. You and your family will enjoy these books.

Noel Streatfeild – Ballet Shoes, Dancing Shoes - While Streatfield wrote several dancing stories after Ballet Shoes, that one is the first and best of the set. The story is about Great-Uncle Max (known as GUM) who brings back several baby orphans from his travels. Named Pauline, Petrova, and Posy, their family becomes poor while Gum goes away on his travels, so they set out to help their family earn some money. Along with learning to dance and act, the girls have many adventures in the process of finding out what they are good at and what they can become when they grow up. This is a WONDERFUL book.

Sydney Taylor – All-of-a-Kind Family - While this book is part of a series, they have mostly been out of print until recently, so I haven’t read them all. But my cousins and I love them. This is the story of a Jewish family in New York City, in the early 1900’s… a family with five girls. They are not precisely poor, but they are not rich, either. I grew up, delighting in how their mother makes dusting the front room into an adventure, how one of the sisters becomes so very stubborn that she won’t eat her dinner, but her parents lovingly expect obedience from her. The girls have adventures at the library and buying penny sweets at the general store, and always, they are celebrating the Jewish holidays with their family. One of my favorites was when they visiting their papa’s shop and found books that had been donated, and they took some of them home. Do these sound like very simple stories? But you see, the quality of writing is excellent, and the love of family and friendship is palpable. I wanted to sample the foods and see the book of paper dolls that they discovered… I still hope to read all of these books, someday. You should, too.

J. R. R. Tolkien – The Lord of the Rings, The Hobbit - By now, you know that I compare many other fantasies to Tolkien. That’s because he sets the bar. And despite my mom being raised on LOTR and my older brother reading them through our childhood, I think I was intimidated by the scary picture of Gollum on the cover. I’m not sure, exactly. It wasn’t until the first trailer came out for the first movie, that I went and picked up a copy at the book store. And was hooked from the first word. Perhaps you think they’re too long or too wordy. Don’t be intimidated by the length, because the story is so amazing that it’s completely worth it, once you’re caught up in it. And while I love the movies, the books are so much better.

Mark Twain - The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn - I first read Tom Sawyer when I was very young, though I reread it a few years ago, and was amazed at all the details that I didn’t remember. The mischief that Tom would get into! I’ve since discovered that Twain wrote sequels to it, but most people don’t know of their existence, because they’re not in print. I have them on my Kindle, though I haven’t read them yet. And Huckleberry Finn is a harder read, but just as worth it. It often gets put down by certain literary critics because of how it was set in the American South when there were still slaves, and words are sometimes used that would be considered racist, nowadays. But you can make your own decisions about what you want to read and how to approach the truth about history, and how we can always treat people better and more kindly.

James Ramsey Ullman – Banner in the Sky - This Newbery Honor book follows young Rudi, whose father died trying to climb The Citadel, the unconquered peak of the Alps. Rudi would like to conquer that portion, in his father’s memory, but can he get past the heartbreak of his father’s memory?

Cynthia Voigt – Dicey’s Song, A Solitary Blue - I haven’t read all of the books about the Tillermans, but Dicey’s Song is about how she’s brought her siblings to her grandmother, and no longer has to be the one in charge. But can she figure out who she is and what to become, without her usual role? I only vaguely remember the Newbery Medal book, but some of Voigt’s other books have also won Newbery Honors, and they’re all supposed to be excellent books.

Gertrude Chandler Warner – The Boxcar Children - I didn’t get around to mentioning the Bobbsey Twins books or even the Nancy Drew books, because I don’t know if I ever read them, and remember… this list mostly includes what I own. But if your children like mysteries, those books can be looked up, also. But I grew up reading the stories about the Boxcar Children, a wonderful story about the Alden family, who make their home in a boxcar… and end up finding a grandfather. It’s been so long, I don’t remember how it happens, exactly. And while the series continues for many, many books, you may wonder how they always fall into mysteries. But why does it matter? They’re wonderful, fun books, and you’ll be glad your kids have gained such a love of reading, when they make their way through the entire series.

Kate Douglas Wiggin – Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm - Written in 1903, this book was beloved by Mark Twain and Jack London, amongst others, and follows the story of young Rebecca, who is sent to live with her stern spinster aunts. They are unused to having a child live with them, but are trying to help out her mother, who has many children to look after. I haven’t read this since I was a little girl, but anyone who has ever read it will tell you it’s wonderful, and you’ll be thankful to have your children reading such a classic. But the Amazon reviews even suggest that adults continue to love it, also.

Laura Ingalls Wilder – Little House in the Big Woods, Little House on the Prairie, On the Banks of Plum Creek, Little Town on the Prairie, The Long Winter, Farmer Boy, By the Shores of Silver Lake, etc.. - Of Wilder’s 9-book series, she won Newbery Honors for five of them. I’ve been wishing I could re-read them all, but we must have worn out my mom’s copies, some time ago. These are for school age children, I don’t care what country you’re from, and American kids (at least when I was growing up) were raised on them. Yes, maybe you’ve heard of the old TV show, but I’ve never watched it. Not because it wasn’t good, but because it’s nothing like the books, not at all. I even bought the series for one of my Aussie girls, for her birthday. These semi-autobiographical stories follow Laura Ingalls’ family from Laura’s early years in the big woods until she marries, while living on the prairie. How I loved to read about Ma and Pa making and baking food for the winter, and parties with family, and making snow candy from maple syrup… and that was before they reached the prairie! On the prairie, there were locusts and Indians and blizzards and other adventures. If I recommended any series of ALL the books I’ve talked about so far… this is the one that I most highly recommend. Boys and girls. My brothers and I read them and loved them. Your children MUST read them. And I’ve heard good things about the prequel and sequel series, which were written by Wilder’s daughter, but I have never read them myself.

Patricia C. Wrede – Dealing With Dragons, Sorcery and Cecilia, Snow White and Rose Red, The Seven Towers, Thirteenth Child, etc.. - The Enchanted Forest Chronicles, which includes Dealing With Dragons are SUCH good fun. While being wonderful books, they don’t take themselves overly seriously, telling about Princess Cimorene, who is tired of being a princess and wants adventure in her life. So, she runs away to live with dragons. Who wouldn’t? You and your children will laugh over them. Sorcery and Cecilia, or the Enchanted Chocolate Pot starts off a trilogy set in an earlier time in England, but in a world that includes magic. So, if you want to imagine your Regency era (or maybe slightly later) while wizards were around, these are for you. My recollection says the kids will enjoy them, too, though they may be a little wordier than the dragon books. Snow White is a fairytale retelling, of course, and The Seven Towers is a standalone fantasy tale that I haven’t read in years, but should be fine for young teens. Take a look for yourself and see what you think. Also, I’ve recently been reading her newest series, which starts with Thirteenth Child (Frontier Magic series), and takes place in a frontier America where magic exists. She explores what it’s like to be the unlucky thirteenth child, who happens to be the twin of an excessively lucky double seventh song, and how they grow up and explore the frontier. I think a mature reader of ten years old could handle them, but again, you know your kids best.

Johann David Wyss – The Swiss Family Robinson - Maybe you’ve seen the Disney movie, which is wonderful, but the book is quite different (while still amazing). In the book, there are more kids, and much more details about the many, many dwellings that the family builds on their new home, after they’re shipwrecked. And I’m telling you, the father of the family has SO much knowledge about everything, it’s fascinating, and I always  wonder what he read when he lived in a “civilized” land. But this book was written before all the countries and islands of the world had been discovered, so Wyss was able to create an island where every animal or tree or plant that he wanted could live. Penguins, flamingos, and everything else… they’re all there. But this is a classic, excellent story that every child will love reading, because who doesn’t want to know that they can survive if they’re shipwrecked on an unknown island? An excellent story.

Jane Yolen – The Devil’s Arithmetic, Briar Rose - Yolen is an interesting author. While she’s now well-known for writing a series of picture books about dinosaurs, some of her literature is much more serious. While Briar Rose is technically a Sleeping Beauty retelling, it is tied to the Holocaust and is no easy read. I’m not even positive that I’ve read it, but you’ll know best whether your teen can handle it. The Devil’s Arithmetic… now, I do remember reading that one. Set during more modern times, it tells of a young girl who has little appreciation for her grandparents’ having survived the Holocaust, but during Passover, she opens the door to symbolically let Elijah in… and is transported to the past. Along her historical journey, she begins to see signs of what she knows about the Holocaust and does her best to warn people… but they think she’s silly. She is swept away on the trains to the death camps… but will she survive to return to her family? This story is not an easy read, but no Holocaust book ever is. But Yolen takes an interesting route of showing you what the times were like, and how this young girl grows up and learns to understand her own family’s history.

Wow, I finished it! Wasn’t sure if that would ever happen!

But already, my previous book list has caused my Aussie friend to have some good memories of the book Baby Island, and how much she used to love it. This is what I’ve been hoping! That people will remember their old favorites, that they lost track of… or that they’d find new ones! So many books that showed up in our elementary school book fairs, school libraries, and the Weekly Reader style book pages that we would take home to order from! I still have an old favorite that I must have lost, but the title isn’t well-known and at the moment, I can’t remember the author. But I still remember the cover and the time travel involved, and how the teenagers went back in time and one of them got stuck in an old-fashioned elevator fancy wire elevator during a power outage… and there was a maid named Pegeen! I know that must sound idiotic, but this is the one book that always slips my memory, even though I bought it from a school Book List, and I think the author’s first name was Richard. Hopefully it will come to me later.

But while I was searching for authors by first name, I came up with this list on Wikipedia of Children’s Literature authors, and when I eventually finish this post, I may go back and see what books I missed. I’m sure there are many that I’ve read and never owned. Presently, I’m going to go see if Astrid Lindgren is on this list, because every child, boy or girl, should read the Pippi Longstocking books.

How nice! It wasn’t on this post, originally, so good thing I checked.  : )

Now, I really hope that this very long list will give you some excellent ideas of what to read, or for your kids to read, and take advantage of how Amazon says that “people who bought this book also bought”, and see where it takes you. You can find some excellent reads just by seeing what others are looking at, if they’re already looking at some of the classics outside of the recent run-of-the-mill fantasy novels. Enjoy and feel free to share if I’ve missed something that I shouldn’t have!

Thanks for being patient with me!

P.S.  I found it! After scrolling through pages of Richards on Amazon, I finally found Richard Peck… who wrote a lot of great books, too. Including a Newbery or two, I’m pretty sure. Anyway, the book I couldn’t remember was called Voices After Midnight. But be sure to check his books out, as well, when you’re looking for good reading!

the best of books…

Recently, I finally finished a beloved book series, The Chronicles of the Imaginarium Geographica, by James A. Owen. I discovered the series about seven years ago, and beginning with Here, There Be Dragons, I’ve never looked back until I finished The First Dragon. Yes, it is a fantasy series, but aimed at younger readers, it takes the readers into adventures in the imaginary worlds of the most well-known and best writers of literature. Not only into those worlds, you travel there with the writers themselves. I can’t imagine a better series to introduce children and adults to some of the best authors that have ever written.

But rather than write a whole review of the books, I had something else in mind with this post. After I posted a glowing review of the series on my FB page, an Aussie friend asked me for some book recommendations for her 13 year old, and asked if this series would be good reading for her son. I agreed that it would be a wonderful series for her kids to read, or for her to read aloud to the younger ones. In this case, her son has already read The Lord of the Rings, so I know he can easily handle this series.

Perhaps some of you would have chosen to ask if they’d read Harry Potter to judge their reading habits, but as much as I enjoy HP, the real way to judge a person’s reading habits is if they’ve read Tolkien. No contest. And this is no slam against you if you’ve never read LOTR, but in the case of kids, it tells you what length and subject matter they can handle. While LOTR has serious themes and storylines in it, it is never gratuitously violent or bloody. And Tolkien is… well, Tolkien. HP may be awesome fun, but Rowling is no Tolkien.10465795_10152468486919976_697175406_o

Ok, enough of that. I became interested in the subject of good reading for my friend, and suggested that I could take the time to go through my own books and make a list. However, as some of you know, I have a huge book collection, so not only did it take a little while, but I came up with a very large list. So, I told my friend that I was upgrading her list to a blog post, because some of you out there might be interested, also. With all the reading and studying I have to do for school, even at the beginning of the semester, I knew this would take me longer than originally planned.

My list includes some books that are on the Newbery Award list, but I decided to provide the link to the official list, which should be especially useful to Aussies, because they don’t have the Newbery Awards over there. If you’ve never heard of them, the Newbery Medal is awarded to one book every year, which is considered the best contribution to children’s literature in that year. Most years, they award several Newbery Honor awards, as well, for the runner-ups. I’m also including the link to the Caldecott Medal winners, which are awarded to the best illustrated children’s book of each year. I was raised on Blueberries for Sal and The Polar Express, so even your younger children can get in on some reading fun.

Just one warning to all parents and readers… these books are my favorites and those of my friends and family, but that doesn’t mean some of them don’t have serious themes. A few of them, I haven’t read for many years, and just remember them being wonderful, but I may have forgotten a serious element that you will object to. Quite a few of these are fantasy, but many are not. If you have objections to stories about magic or tales of fantasy, that’s your call. No matter what I recommend, you should use Goodreads, Amazon, or Barnes & Noble’s websites to read other reviews or just read the blurb on the back of the book. You should always know what your kids are reading, no matter what I say about these books. That awareness will allow you to have good conversations with your children, or decide whether your child can’t handle that type of subject matter yet. YOU know your children best, so make your own decisions about these books, please. :)  Happy reading!

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Louisa May Alcott – Little Women, Little Men, Jo’s Boys, Eight Cousins (or the Aunt Hill), Rose in Bloom, An Old-Fashioned Girl - Of course, everyone has heard of Little Women, but how many people have ventured beyond Alcott’s most well-known book? I tend to prefer Little Men to Little Women, because of the antics of the boys, and her writing quality goes downhill in Jo’s Boys. But the latter three on this list… I might possibly love them more than the first three. If you’ve never read the duology of Eight Cousins and Rose in Bloom, then you need to, and An Old-Fashioned Girl is a wonderful story of how the Country Mouse met the City Mice and helped them out by being herself. Who doesn’t need a story like that to help them through life?

Alan Armstrong – Whittington – I think this one is a Newbery Honor book, and though I don’t remember much, I remember that it was a really good book.

L. Frank Baum – The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, Dorothy and the Wizard in Oz, Ozma of Oz, The Tin Woodman of Oz, The Emerald City of Oz, The Patchwork Girl of Oz, etc.. - Most of us were raised on the movie version of Wizard of Oz, but the original book and the rest of the series is even more magical for any child’s imagination, and I read and reread many of these when I was a child. Baum had a marvelous imagination, and when I was a child, I was enthralled at the idea of all kinds of queer creatures and objects coming to life in Baum’s stories.

Jeanne Birdsall – The Penderwicks: A Summer Tale of Four Sisters, Two Rabbits and a Very Interesting Boy, The Penderwicks on Gardam Street - It’s been a while since I read the first one, but I still need to get my hands on the rest of Birdsall’s books about the Penderwicks, because they’re a fun-loving and charming family that remind of what it was like when our children played outdoors with animals and each other, rather than staying inside on their computers.

Michael Bond – A Bear Called Paddington, Paddington Helps Out, etc.. - I read these for the first time, recently, and especially for younger children, the unthinking mischief of Paddington will be charming.

Carol Ryrie Brink - Caddie Woodlawn, Baby Island - Caddie is the most famous of Brink’s books, as she won the Newbery Medal for it, but if I’m honest, I’ll say that my copy of Baby Island is so worn out that it lost its cover long ago.  The premise that two little girls could be shipwrecked with a boatload of babies to look after, and end up on a desert island… What’s not to love?

Frances Hodgson Burnett – A Little Princess, The Secret Garden, The Lost Prince, Little Lord Fauntleroy – Burnett is another author that gets short shrift over what I consider her best book. I grew up reading The Lost Prince, and as much as I love A Little Princess and The Secret Garden, the adventures of Marco and The Rat were just as fascinating, if not more so. And if your children (girls AND boys) have been raised on the movie versions of her books, then I tell you now that they NEVER get the story right concerning these books. Shirley Temple is amazing, but her movie version of A Little Princess is all wrong, and the same goes for The Secret Garden. Every child should read these books, and fall in love with the correct version of the story. Also, I never read Fauntleroy until I was in my twenties, but I found that story charming and great fun, as well.

Susan Butler - The Hermit Thrush Sings - It has been many years since I read this one, so I should probably reread it. Amazon refreshed my memory… this is a dystopian tale from before The Hunger Games and other books became popular. It’s a world where people live in numbered villages and very few people go out of the villages, because the animals are so dangerous. Leora is a young girl who is different in a world where they’re expected to be perfect physically and think in the same way. Amazon says it’s for age 12 and up, but I think younger readers can handle it… I don’t remember anything too dark for them.

Beverly Cleary – Beezus and Ramona, Ramona the Pest, The Mouse and the Motorcycle, Runaway RalphI loved reading the Ramona books, when I was younger, and even further back, I know I read the Mouse books. Beverly Cleary is the voice of my childhood, and even the movie version of Beezus and Ramona is pretty good. These can be read by any age group, and parents will enjoy them as well.

Suzanne Collins – The Hunger Games trilogy - Since I don’t jump on every bandwagon of popularity, it took a recommendation from my cousin to get me to read these, several years ago. I enjoyed them so much that I’ve read them several times since then, though my younger brother doesn’t see the attraction. They’re a set of books to make you think, when you consider how our world of reality television affects our lives, and every parent needs to decide for themselves if their child can handle the violence of the Games. Also, I’ve heard about Collins’ other books, the series about Gregor the Overlander, but I haven’t read them. Always worth taking a lot, however.

Caroline B. Cooney – The Ransom of Mercy Carter - All American kids were raised on the stories of cowboys and Indians, and westerns… at least, they used to be. Not only was I raised on Louis L’Amour and Zane Grey (the best of the American Western books), but when I was in high school, I read everything in the Native American non-fiction section of the library. Without arguing with anyone on the treatment of the American Indians, I read every book of non-fiction and fiction that I could get on the subject, at the time. And that brought me to Cooney’s tale of Mercy Carter, which is based on a true story. Cooney’s books are normally more like The Face on the Milk Carton, which I have never read, but her other books are supposed to be good. The true stories of how some Americans were kidnapped and/or ransomed by the Native Americans, back during pioneer days, covers a lot of territory… some of them never returned to their families and some took the opportunity to be ransomed or to escape. Cooney wanted to explore the whys and wherefores behind Mercy Carter’s own story, and crafted this book as a result. You won’t be disappointed.

D. M. Cornish – Monster Blood Tattoo trilogy: Foundling, Lamplighter, Factotum – Cornish’s trilogy has a flavor of Charles Dickens to his writing, complete with his fantastic drawings and a glossary of his world. A world where monsters exist and are a serious danger, and young Rossamund is in the middle of it. The title of the trilogy is a little off-putting, I suppose, but the reason for it is more innocuous than you might realize. If your kids already read fantasy, then this may be for them, because it was written for young teens, or even pre-teens. While looking for an age recommendation on Amazon, I saw a write-up that said a grandparent had bought one of these for their 9 year old grandson. If you have a serious reader, who likes fantasy, on your hands, this series will be for you.

Arthur Conan Doyle – Sherlock Holmes: The Sign of Four, The Hound of the Baskervilles, The Sign of Four, etc.. - These titles are only a few of the books or short stories that Conan Doyle wrote about Sherlock Holmes. By now, we know that the movies and TV shows have enduring popularity, but everyone should look back on the books that began it. Readers of any age should be able to handle them, though the younger ones might be a little unnerved by The Hound of the Baskervilles. I was warned to not read it after dark, but I did it anyway, and was prepared. I’m not sure that my younger self would have been ready for it, though.

Sharon Creech – Ruby Holler, Chasing Redbird, Walk Two Moons, The Great Unexpected - These books are for any age, and though I don’t remember specific details of all of them, they’re very much along the lines of Caddie Woodlawn and other adventures for any age. Sometimes the stories contain magical elements, but several of them involve children in reduced circumstances, going through adventures they never expected.

Alison Croggon – The Books of Pellinor: The Naming, The Riddle, The Crow, The Singing - I would describe this series as slightly Tolkienesque, though not as good as Tolkien, of course. You can see where the description of the Hulls were probably affected by what we know of the Ringwraiths, and yet, this is still Croggon’s own amazing tale. Maerad is raised as a slave, having no knowledge of her background, until Cadvan rescues her. In a world of magical Bards, she must learn to control her powers and use them to save her world. I originally found the first book in a YA section in a Borders (remember Borders?), when YA could be for pre-teens, also. I’d guess these are for age 10 and up.

Karen Cushman - Catherine, Called Birdy; The Midwife’s Apprentice; Matilda Bone; The Ballad of Lucy Whipple - With several Newbery Honor mentions and one or two Newbery Medals to her name, Cushman’s books are for any age. If your kids like some history, several of her books are set in the 1400’s or 1500’s, while Lucy Whipple is (I think) during the pioneer days of America.

Charles Dickens – The Pickwick Papers - I didn’t start reading Dickens until recently, though I always knew OF him, because the characters in Little Women loved his books. So, if you get the chance, start your kids on these classics early, even if you have to read them aloud and do all the voices. I think Pickwick could be handled by most ages, but some others might wait a little while because there are some darker themes in Little Dorrit, Oliver Twist, and Bleak House. And for the record, the recent BBC mini-series versions of some of these are amazing, and were helpful to me in getting into the story before reading them.

Julie Andrews Edwards – Mandy, The Last of the Really Great Whangdoodles- In case you didn’t realize it, this is the Julie Andrews of The Sound of Music fame, and a published author, in her own right. My favorite is Mandy, which is the story of a young orphan girl who adopts a little house for her own, to fix it up, and where this project leads her. An adventure for any age, boy or girl.

Elizabeth Enright – Spiderweb for Two: A Melendy Maze, Thimble Summer - I have only vague recollections of when I last read Thimble Summer, but this book won Enright the Newbery Medal for her story of Garnet’s special summer. Spiderweb was always one of my favorites, though, with the Melendys embarking on a summer of solving riddles and looking for clues, searching for the treasure at the end of the line. At one point, I realized that there were other books about the Melendy family, but I’ve never actually read any of them. But anything written by Enright will keep your children happily enthralled for their own summer.

Walter Farley – The Black Stallion, Man O’War - I have read the books, somewhere along the line, but these were more my older brothers line of reading. I always enjoyed The Black Stallion movie, but I was more into reading other horse books. Farley wrote many more, and they’re well-loved by girls and boys alike, so look them up!

Jean Craighead George – My Side of the Mountain, Julie of the Wolves, etc.. - Again, my memories of Julie are very vague, as I was probably younger than ten years old when I read it. It won the Newbery Medal. But my favorite was the story of Sam in My Side of the Mountain, and how he learned to survive in the wilderness, even to the point of making friends with several animals and carving himself a home inside of a tree. Doesn’t every child, at some point, want to live in the wild and have their own hawk for a pet?

Elizabeth Goudge – The Little White Horse, Linnets and Valerians - It was sometime in my twenties when I came across The Little White Horse in a Borders bookstore, and I was caught from the very first word in the story. Any age could read this story of young Maria Merryweather and how she returns to her family home to discover an adventure in involving unicorns, lions, and a somewhat magical friend of hers. Who knew that an argument over favorite colors, pink or red, could cause so much trouble? I look forward to reading this with my own children, some day, and it didn’t take me long to go looking for Goudge’s other books. Actually, she’s written several books for adults that I haven’t read, but some of which I still would like to. However, Linnets and Valerians was also written for children, and it’s a charming story of a group of siblings that move to a village with their stern uncle and wondrous things begin to happen around them.

Kenneth Grahame – The Wind in the Willows - Like a lot of kids, I had seen the Disney version of Mr. Toad’s Wild Adventure, but for some reason, I don’t remember ever actually reading this book. And then I discovered Robert Ingpen, and I never looked back. Ingpen is an amazing illustrator from Australia (I learned this long before I went to AUS), and I fell in love with his version of Wind in the Willows. My family loves books with beautiful illustrations, and I would happily own any story that Ingpen had illustrated. While reading, it amazed me that I could not have read this wonderful book, despite loving the Redwall books as much as I do. So, don’t neglect this story, but find Ingpen’s version, if you can.

Shannon Hale – The Goose Girl, Princess Academy, Book of a Thousand Days, etc.. - While aware that Hale has written several other books, including two more that are supposedly a trilogy (?) that go with Goose Girl, I’ve never read the rest of the books of Bayern. That’s no slam, I just never felt the need to find them, when I finally heard of them. As I love re-tellings of classic fairy tales, I was delighted by this book’s ability to flesh out the story of the princess who had to become a goose girl, and then how she triumphed over her adversity. On the other hand, Thousand Days is a story of a servant girl who befriends a rich girl, and they are locked into a tower together for seven years. I think I read somewhere that it was based on a fairytale by Grimm, but I was never aware of it when I read it. Excellent reading for girls AND boys, because the boys need to be convinced that just because a girl is the main character doesn’t mean it isn’t a good story! I read plenty of adventure stories with boys involved when I was growing up, so the boys shouldn’t miss out on all the other adventures available.

Rachel Hartman – Seraphina - Fairly recently published, I’m looking forward to when Hartman’s sequel is published, which will continue the story of Seraphina, who struggles to hide her own dangerous secret, amidst the intrigues of the court, in a world where humans and dragons are still struggling to find peace with one another. This one can be read by the pre-teens, also.

Marguerite Henry – Misty of Chincoteague; King of the Wind; Stormy, Misty’s Foal - Do you remember that I mentioned horse books that I preferred to the ones my brothers were reading? While there were others, we read our way through Henry’s books about Chincoteague and the wild ponies that lived there. My older brother and I wanted to go there and see them for ourselves, and reading about them was the next best thing, for Chincoteague is a real place, even if most of the horses were fictional.

James Herriot - All Things Bright and Beautiful, All Creatures Great and Small, All Things Wise and Wonderful, The Lord God Made Them All - Do your children like animals? Or are you a grown-up animal lover? Herriot’s books were written for any age, and tell the true story of his own veterinary adventures in the Yorkshire countryside, though the names are changed. He doesn’t pull any punches with stories of cows in labor and some of the things that happen to the animals around him, but the language was never bad, and we read these repeatedly, when we were growing up. Still do. You can also find picture books of his dog stories, if you’re looking for something for the really young kids. Every person should have a steady diet of James Herriot’s veterinary tales.

Brian Jacques – Redwall, Mossflower, The Long Patrol, Marlfox, Martin the Warrior, Castaways of the Flying Dutchman, etc.. - I was visiting my cousins in New York State, when I was in my late teens, and they introduced me to the books of Brian Jacques. While I was there, I read through an entire shelf of his books, and as soon as I returned home, I began to add them to my own collection. The adventures of the animals of Redwall Abbey and Martin the Warrior are full of thrilling battles, delicious feasts (you’ll be drooling, I promise you), and fascinating riddles. I spent most of twenties in waiting for the next book to come out, every year, and when I found that Jacques had died, my heart just about broke. No more new stories? He was only three books into his Flying Dutchman series, too, which while not as awesome as Redwall, was very good. And I own a copy of The Redwall Cookbook, too, because life without shrimp ‘n hotroot soup would be extremely dull. Take your children to Redwall, and they’ll thank you for it!

Rudyard Kipling – The Jungle Book, Just So Stories - Like most of us, I grew up on the Disney version of Kipling’s book, but I did eventually read his collection of stories about Mowgli, and probably should read them again. Like Dickens, these are classics that every child should read, and teens should be torn away from the horrors of the YA Paranormal Romance section in the bookstores. Give them some GOOD stuff to read!

Louis L’Amour – To the Far Blue Mountains, Ride the River, Jubal Sackett, Sackett’s Land - While not every L’Amour book may be for children, my brothers and I (and my mom and uncles before us) were raised on these Westerns, especially the Sackett books. While his The Walking Drum is one of my favorites, it’s heavier reading than the Sackett books, and there’s nothing wrong with the language, nor are you subjected to unnecessary bedroom scenes. No, L’Amour knew they weren’t needed. His books were about pioneers and cowboys, mainly, but some were set in more “recent” times. You can’t go wrong with this author, though every parent should, of course, keep a close eye on what they’re having their child read.  : )

Madeleine L’Engle – A Wrinkle in Time, The Wind in the Door, Many Waters, etc.. - Growing up, I was creeped out by the picture on my brother’s copy of Wrinkle in Time, which is probably what kept me from reading it until I was in my twenties. But knowing that L’Engle had won a Newbery medal for it, I eventually persevered and read her main five books and then a few more. Her books are very interesting, well-written, and… well, they can be quite strange. The fantastical parts, at least. They follow Meg Murry and her brother Charles Wallace as they travel into the unknown to save their father. I find her books making me wonder if she believes in a Creator God, or if she’s just trying to make her readers think about what is out there. Many Waters is a foray into a time-travel visit to the time of Noah, so she definitely delves into the ideas of faith, what is in the cosmos, and what is inside ourselves.

Andrew Lang – The Blue Fairy Book, The Crimson Fairy Book, The Violet Fairy Book, etc.. - I love fairy tales, especially when I don’t have to “dissect” them for any English Literature classes. I think I actually own all of Lang’s color books on my Kindle, but it’s not the same as having them in your hand. His series of fairy tale collections is a must for anyone who loves fairy tales.

Jane Langton - The Fledgling (Hall Family Chronicles) - Not for the first time, I found out that the one book I’ve read by a particular author was only one of a series, but I’ve never gotten around to finding or reading the rest. I just know that this book won a Newbery Honor award and it was about a little girl who discovered she could fly and made friends with the local geese. Or that’s what I remember about it. And if I could have a super power, I’d want to fly, and when I was younger, I dreamed about flying. So, this book was right up my alley, as a child.

Lois Lenski – Strawberry Girl, Indian Captive: The Story of Mary Jemison, Betsy-Tacy - I only vaguely remember Strawberry Girl and I’m not even sure if I ever read Betsy-Tacy, but that means that I read them when I was very young. I was always reading above my age level, and these are wonderful books for children. But if you read my comments above concerning Mercy Carter, then you’ll realize why I had to pick up a copy of Indian Captive. Both are extremely well-written, but go in totally different directions, both geographically as well as story-wise. Lenski is a must-read author for children of most ages.

Gail Carson Levine - Ella Enchanted, Ever, Fairest - I don’t have that many pet peeves, but if there’s one thing that annoys me, it’s when a fantastic books is made into a really, really, really bad movie. Why would anyone go read the book, if they’ve seen a perfectly dreadful movie? Doesn’t matter that it was my first introduction to Anne Hathaway, NEVER EVER let your child go see the movie version of Ella Enchanted. Because the BOOK was a Newbery Honor book and was an amazing re-telling of the Cinderella story, with an unforgettable finale. Yes, the premise of the story is that she has an obedience spell cast upon her, as a child, and she can’t disobey anyone who knows it. It’s a fantastic story, and it still has one of my favorite endings to any book for young people. And what the movie did with it! Excuse me while I go cool off… Before I forget, all of Levine’s books are wonderful, so pick up any you can get your hands on.

C. S. Lewis – Narnia: The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, The Voyage of the Dawn Treader, The Horse and His Boy, etc.. -With the arrival of the Narnia movies in theaters, a new generation was introduced to the beloved stories of C. S. Lewis. But no one should stop there, because The Chronicles of Narnia are so much more amazing than the movies could ever be. Any age can read them, and they’ll read them again and again. I certainly did. While I never went banging on the walls inside my closet, I have known people that did so, because of reading these books when they were children. What child wouldn’t want to discover a new world from the back of their wardrobe? According to Lewis’s books, boys can be total brats but learn to be brave and strong, girls can act silly or be selfish and then learn to do right… and you can’t change the past, but you can choose different actions to have an effect on your future. These adventures are for girls and boys of all ages, even for the grown-ups! I still love reading about Aslan, Tumnus, Puddleglum, Trumpkin, and many, many others.

Yes, I know, I had to call a halt. I plan to finish up soon, I promise! But since I began this post back in January and then got tied up with school, it’s about time I posted it… wouldn’t you say so? The rest of my list of authors are already waiting for me to fill in the blanks, in another post, but after wracking my brain to writing about over 30 authors, I need a short break. Remember, this is not a complete list, and there are many, many more wonderful books and authors out there! Take advantage of all the sources online to see what others think of the individual books and be fully aware of what your kids are reading, and I truly hope that this list will help you turn your children into avid readers with imaginations that know no boundaries.

Read on!

 

not a book review…

I say this isn’t a review, because I’m not even finished with the book yet, nor am I commentating on whether it’s a phenomenal book in general or not. I find it informative and interesting, but you can form your own opinion. But I think that any parent who is having issues with the Common Core Education standards should have an opportunity to take a look at this book, and read up on it.

I’ve been reading Conform: Exposing the Truth About Common Core and Public Education, by Glenn Beck. Now, not everyone out there likes Beck, and I understand that. Personally, I think talk radio is very informative but I prefer to READ when I want to learn about something. So, I’m more likely to read a transcript of a radio show, if I want to know what’s up. I’m just telling you this because I know some people may immediately come back with their opinions of Glenn Beck, and quite frankly, I’m not interested.10414330_10152438131869976_1996288812_o

What I am interested in is Common Core, and how it’s affecting American children, and how did it come to be a standard in the first place? If you don’t pick up Beck’s book, you should look for another book on the subject, and find out why you and your children are yanking your hair out trying to learn math in a totally scrambled way.

Since I’m reading a Kindle version, I’m not sure how to give you the page number, but I’m reading Chapter 12 right now, which is called “Common Core is “State Led”” and it’s 25% of the way through the book. It is especially interesting to know that the 2009 stimulus plan had earmarks to help “encourage” states to join Common Core, as well as to give them waivers for “No Child Left Behind”. But who voted on it? This says that our unelected state school board members were the ones that chose to adopt it, state by state. And when I say “encouraged”, I mean that federal money was waived under their noses in order to get them to do it.

I bookmarked a page that quotes former Texas education commissioner Robert Scott, who explains why Texas did not give in and use Common Core. Does anyone else think it’s odd that he was asked to sign off on the standards, before they were even written, even when he needed to consult with the Texas legislature and other Texas teachers? Those standards were written “behind closed doors” and he was not allowed to view them beforehand.

You may want more details on what the book talks about, but I think everyone can do their own research and decide if the book’s for you. Just telling a bit about it, and you can take it from there.  : )

I am sharing this recommendation because I’ve read enough tweets and heard enough complaints about Common Core, in person and online, to know that people are asking where these standards came from, and why are American children being required to follow them. So, if you’re frustrated with Common Core, it pays to study up on how it got into schools. But again, I haven’t finished the book yet, and I may not even agree with everything Beck says about everything (in the book or elsewhere). That’s okay. You can learn from this one, and expand on your knowledge elsewhere. It’s a place to start, wouldn’t you say?

P.S. I was not asked by anyone else to write about this book, I just wanted to share in case there’s a parent somewhere who is interested to learn more about the subject.

baby steps…

One thing at a time… that’s the way to get through everything. You wouldn’t believe how a few small things that you’ve been putting off can get on your mind, and interfere with your thought process. It’s summer, you should be free to do whatever and relax! No, my small list needs to be worked through, and I’m not even going to tell you all that’s on it. But getting some much-needed encouragement from one of my followers (you do read me, you do!) was very helpful, and I finally checked off a small item. Who know that shipping some packages overseas could get on your conscience so badly? But ask one of my Aussie friends how long it took to mail a package, last time. Answer: over a year.

But now, it’s a lovely sunny day, a few of my brother’s friends are coming for dinner and bringing their baby, and people upstairs are making homemade pasta, spaghetti sauce, and Italian bread. What’s not to love about this situation?

Another thing I’m starting to work on is our former “pool room”, which also became my cousin’s bedroom before he left for Ohio, to get his Master’s. Or rather, he’s leaving for OH in the fall, but he’s left our house, which amounts to the same thing. And now, the pool room will become my room. In addition to my bedroom, of course. Some of you have seen pictures of the bookshelves, and then there’s a desk buried under everything. Now, it’s total chaos, because I had to move the desk to a different wall without taking the bed apart… next up, disassembling the bed. Then, there’ll be a gap in the mess to see through, and I have to look into donating things again. But I also put together another desk that has been in a box for forever.

Yes, you read that right, I now have two desks, side by side, and when there’s space to move, I’ll be able to roll my chair back and forth between them. But soon, soon there will be room. One thing at a time, remember? I promised to help with some cleaning projects and things around the house this summer, so some days I work on cleaning windows and vacuuming floors, other days I read (ok, I always read), and on some days, I work on my room in the basement. And those aren’t even on that mental list that I was talking about.

But here I am, making myself write again, because a little weight came off my shoulders when I mailed those packages, and maybe I’ll even get to writing about Seabrook next and posting the pictures. In addition to several posts about books that have been sitting in my draft section for some time.

To all my followers, both recent and past, thank you for reading and following along. Please forgive me for sounding a bit crabby yesterday, and hang in there. Have a great week!

P.S. For any other Aussies that have dropped by, congratulations to the Blues for winning the first Origin round of 2014DSC_0822, but I still say…. Go Maroon! Until June!

trying to do better…

My blog views are “rocketing” today, and I just realized that State of Origin must be happening in dear old Queensland, Australia. I wrote those posts so long ago, but what I had to say about rugby league football and the Queensland Maroons still applies, even if I’ve been away from AUS for more than 2 years now.

Meanwhile, summer is in full swing, and I haven’t felt like writing. Or posting. Despite just having been to Seabrook for my conference. So, I will try and shape up, and get back to posting now and then. If you have a blog, you’ll know that every blogger goes through ups and downs, trying to figure out where they are as a writer, and having days when you’ve got nothing to share. Or don’t know how to share it.

I even know that my stats tell me that I have over 400 followers, but even that can be a little depressing when I can tell that many of them are those “blogs” where they tell you how to get rich and travel the world… is that even fair, that they use you for advertising, when there’s no proof that they ever read your blog? I would like to know that what I write and the photos I take… I want them to be interesting to someone, or even to brighten someone’s day. No one wants their “followers” to be a bunch of fakes.

I don’t mean that to sound that harsh. Many of you have been following me since I was in Australia, and some of you probably do read my posts. I wish I could write something exciting and fun, like I used to, when I was chasing my Aussie kiddos…

If you’re a fellow blogger, and know what it’s like, I hope you’ll have a cheerful word for me. Some of my writing mojo is missing, and I can’t seem to find it again. Hang in there, and I should figure this out again.  : )DSC_0818 DSC_0821

all done…

I’m reminded of all the little kids who finish their meal, and inform their parents that they are finished eating. They’re full, they’re ready to be done with food for the present, and they’re ready to go do something else. I can relate.

Classes are finished for the summer, and I’m ready for the break of thinking too much. If I can find a part-time job that doesn’t require too much mental gymnastics, I’ll be thrilled. Something different that brought in a little cash would be handy. But aside from future job-hunting, first up is just to relax and catch up on a bit of sleep. And then make myself useful around our house, put in a bit of “spring-cleaning”. With pollen season almost over and being a former housekeeper, that won’t be too difficult.

I think I’m rambling because I’m still tired, but hopefully the fog in my brain will clear over time, and I’ll be able to get in some decent blogging again. While I’ve shared about school stuff, there have been times when I wished I could share the interesting things of life again, without having to go right back to a paper that needed editing. Or to be let loose in the Botanical Gardens, and come up with photos to share.

However, again, I have been making use of my camera phone, when nothing else was available. So, I have pics of all sorts of random things to share, eventually.

Let’s see… aside from job hunting, sleeping, cleaning, and brushing up on the blogging/camera skills… what else? Some of my friends have teased me about “catching up” on my reading. Maybe I’ll eventually get around to reading the nonfiction that I enjoy, for fun, but I need a little more distance from my history class before I finish the last nonfiction book I started over Christmas.

On the other hand, I plan to keep up with my German skills, and I’m making use of a German For Dummies and The Complete Idiot’s Guide To German, which I bought several years ago. Two chapters into one of them, and I’ve realized that I learned all of that part in the last two semesters, and that I can translate most everything they’ve said. But I should learn some new things, in a fun way, as I keep reading. Also, I am wondering a bit how long you can learn a language before you start understanding it without thinking about it. I think it would be really neat to reach that point.

Well, I guess that’s it for now. I’ll have to share some pictures with you another time, because I obviously need to upload them from my phone or camera. Have a good summer!

P.S. It occurs to me that I should probably have exciting plans for things like going to the beach or visiting friends, but since I had a recent trip north, I haven’t thought that far ahead yet. I will be attending my Seabrook Conference in two weeks, so I’ll definitely be hitting the beach soon. But when I come up with a good idea for a beach trip, I’ll fill you in. Opportunity is there, I just haven’t been able to think about it yet! : )

an arctic assault…

As one friend of mine suggested, it really does sound like our local TV weatherman is getting his lines from Cobra Commander. I suppose that after the week of the “polar vortex”, you’ve got to come up with some lingo that sounds even more exciting? Now, if we actually do get snow or ice, and if that turns into an ice storm that brings down all the neighborhood trees, and leaves us stuck in our houses for another week… then perhaps I’ll reconsider whether you used the right words or not.

Until then, another friend has suggested that the weatherman come out to Iowa for a visit, in order to see what real cold weather is like, while I heard a rumor that the buildings at Clemson University are being heated like we’re in Finland, instead of South Carolina. Considering I just played Ultimate Frisbee in 50 degree weather in a t-shirt and exercise pants, the idea that we could have really cold weather coming in is pretty hard to believe. The wind is picking up, however, so I guess it really will get cold tonight. The question is whether we’ll really get any type of precipitation.

If we actually get snow or ice and it sticks until tomorrow, school will get canceled, which is every student’s dream… as long as they have food and heat, wherever they live. And, of course, that will require a run on the grocery stores, in order to stock up on all the ingredients to make French toast. Even in Pennsylvania, this seemed to happen if there was snow in the forecast… everyone went to Walmart to buy eggs, bread, and milk. Go figure.

But for those of you who really aren’t interested in the weather, my second semester at Clemson started almost two weeks ago, and I’m settling in to my new classes. No math or science, but German, Irish History, Historian’s Craft (history methodology), and British Lit are going to keep me busy reading, writing, and researching. To liven things up, I’m taking “Frisbee Sports”, which is the fancy name for my Ultimate Frisbee “class”.

For any bookworms out there, I do have an upcoming post about books for children, probably ages 10-13, or thereabouts, but it may take me a week or three to finish, because school does keep me occupied. I am still trying to fit in a new post, now and then, and as soon as spring arrives, I should be able to get the floral photos going again! Have a great week!